Fire Up the Grill with Barbecue Meatball Skewers

Fire Up the Grill with Barbecue Meatball Skewers

There's nothing better than firing up the grill and gathering in the backyard with family and friends. While everyone expects to see burgers, dogs and steaks, you can show your guests you're a true barbecue master by serving up smoky, grilled appetizers fresh off the grill.

Try a new fan favorite of the season - Barbecue Meatball Skewers with Mozzarella- courtesy of Chris Lilly, world champion pitmaster. This recipe for deliciously gooey grilled meatball skewers is a tasty way to kick the party off right. The key is a little trick all pitmasters know: the two-zone fire. Simply put, the two-zone fire splits the grill in half. Pile hot charcoal on one half for direct, high-heat cooking and searing, while leaving the other side free of charcoal for lower-temperature cooking of dishes, such as appetizers and sides. Pitmasters and novice grillers alike choose Kingsford(r) charcoal to keep their grills burning bright. These briquets light faster and burn hotter than other fuel sources.

Follow these tips for creating the perfect two-zone charcoal fire:

1. Light your coals using a chimney starter or lighter fluid. For high heat, use a full chimney of charcoal or light a pile of about 100 briquettes.

2. Pour out your hot coals on one side or use a spatula or tongs to carefully move all the coals to cover 50 percent of the lower grill grate.

3. The void space, free of coals directly underneath the grates, is still hot. Food will cook there - just not as fast as on the direct side, right above the coals.

4. Use the hot side of your grill for direct cooking with high heat-for example, searing a steak to get good color, caramelization and grill marks. Use the other side for slow, indirect cooking and to let foods cook through after searing. The coal-free side also serves as a flame-free zone. In case of flare-ups, just move your food to the indirect side until the flames subside, then move them back to the direct side to finish cooking.

For more grilling tips and recipes, visit www.kingsford.com.

A Kitchen Staple

Olive oil offers nutrition, flexibility

You may be surprised to learn that cooking with olive oil is a simple way to add heart-healthy "good" fats to your diet. In fact, the health benefits, flavor and versatility of olive oil are all good reasons that olive oil is a staple in many kitchens.   Not only can you replace other oils in recipes with olive oil (or extra virgin olive oil for added flavor), in many recipes you can also replace butter with olive oil to reduce saturated fat, cholesterol and calories.

Studies show that your body absorbs nutrients from greens and vegetables better when they are consumed with a monounsaturated fat such as olive oil. These recipes help you get the most out of your veggies, and enjoy a decadent dessert too. Learn more at www.aboutoliveoil.org.